Tag Archives: Famous Dave’s

Holy Barbecue Chicken, Batman!!

I had chicken thighs.  I had BBQ sauce.  Lots of BBQ sauce.  And I have a Weber kettle.  Let’s cook some chicken!!

Bok bok bok!

Bok bok bok!

As you can see above, I took a value pack of chicken thighs and trimmed them up just a little bit.  I then seasoned the thighs both under the skin and on the skin with Draper’s BBQ A.P. Rub.

Seasoned Thighs

Seasoned Thighs

On to the grill they go!!  They were cooked skin-side down for about 5-10 minutes, then they were flipped and sauced.  Because this was a test cook for me, I ended up using several sauces.

Sam Dog Yellow Dog & Johnny Harris Carolina Style

Sam Dog Yellow Dog & Johnny Harris Carolina Style

Texas Tamale Co. Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce and Famous Dave's Devil's Spit

Texas Tamale Co. Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce and Famous Dave's Devil's Spit

Instead of my normal breakdown of individual sauces, I decided to do a foursome for this week in one post.  I’ll keep it short and simple for summarizing each sauce.

Johnny Harris Carolina Style Bar-B-Cue Sauce

Johnny Harris Carolina Style Bar-B-Cue Sauce

First up is Johnny Harris Carolina Style Bar-B-Cue Sauce from Savannah, GA.  As you can see from the picture above, the sauce has a yellowish gold color to it. A naked taste reminded me of a pale spicy mustard.  It didn’t really wow me.  It did just okay on chicken.  Again, nothing overly amazing.  But if you like a safe mustard based sauce, you may like this.

Texas Tamale Co. Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce

Texas Tamale Co. Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce

Next up is Texas Tamale Company Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce.  This sauce had a nice dark red color.  The flavors in the sauce emphasize savory more than sweet.  This could be a very versatile sauce, and I could really see this as an ingredient in someone’s prize-winning chili recipe!  Works great as a condiment too.

Famous Dave's Devil's Spit BBQ Sauce

Famous Dave's Devil's Spit BBQ Sauce

The next sauce is Famous Dave’s Devil’s Spit BBQ Sauce.  Just by looking at the label, you can venture a guess that this sauce has some heat to it.  And it certainly does not disappoint!  The sauce has flavors of molasses and pepper on the front end, and the heat comes up on the back end.  It’s potent, so if you’re averse to sauces with heat, you’ll want to avoid this one.  And when it’s cooked, the heat is even sneakier.

Sam Dog Yellow Dog BBQ Sauce

Sam Dog Yellow Dog BBQ Sauce

The final sauce is one that I have previously reviewed but decided to have again.  This sauce is Sam Dog Yellow Dog Barbecue Sauce.  This sauce won 1st place at the 2011 National Barbecue Association Awards of Excellence, and it’s very obvious why!  This sauce is a perfect blend of sweet, mustard, buttery, and rich flavors.  You would almost never guess that this was a mustard-based sauce.

Since this is my first time reviewing sauces using this format, I’d love to hear your feedback.  Do you like this style?  Or do you like seeing your sauces reviewed one at a time?  Let me know!

Ribs for 30, Or How My First Pseudo-Catering Gig Went

[tweetmeme source=”brownkw” only_single=false]

Today was THE day I had been anticipating for quite some time.  About a month ago, a co-worker and I volunteered to cook for the entire office (around 30 people).  The original plan was for us to just cook pork butt, but it ended up that I volunteered to cook ribs while my co-worker would take care of the pork butt.  So here’s how that went…

First step — two days ago, I bought a whole bunch of spare ribs from Restaurant Depot (9 racks) and trim them to a St. Louis cut.

Spare ribs, trimmed to a St. Louis cut

Spare ribs, trimmed to a St. Louis cut

Last night, the ribs were slathered in Famous Dave’s Rich and Sassy BBQ Sauce and lightly seasoned with Willie’s Hog Dust Original Blend BBQ Rub.  After being slathered and seasoned, the ribs went into the refrigerator for the night.

Slathered and Seasoned

Slathered and Seasoned

This morning started early as I woke up at 3:45am to fire up the smoker.  At 4:45am, the smoker was up to 250 degrees, and in went the ribs!  The ribs cooked at between 225 and 250 degrees using oak wood.

Lots of ribs, about 2 1/2 hours in

Lots of ribs, about 2 1/2 hours in

At the three hour mark, I re-seasoned the ribs and put them back in the smoker.  At four hours in, I pull the ribs, add some dark brown sugar and honey, and foil them.

Ribs prior to brown sugar and honey drizzle

Ribs prior to brown sugar and honey drizzle

After another hour, the ribs were unfoiled and glazed with sweet BBQ sauce from Butcher BBQ.  The ribs were pulled after a grand total of 6 hours in the smoker.

About to be sauced

About to be sauced

The finished product.  Bad lighting, but it had beautiful color!

The finished product. Bad lighting, but it had beautiful color!

When the ribs were finished, they were wrapped in foil and placed in a towel-lined cooler for transport.  Once on-site, the ribs were sliced and ready to serve.

Yours truly slicing the ribs

Yours truly slicing the ribs. Picture courtesy of the company president.

Ready to serve.  Crappy cell phone pic.

Ready to serve. Crappy cell phone pic.

So how did it turn out?  If I go by how much food was left, it was a success with there only being five ribs left.  Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with one woman declaring it the best ribs she’s ever eaten.  Now if that doesn’t boost my ego, nothing will!

So that was my first experience with cooking for more than 3 or 4 people.  Except for the whole “getting up at 3:45am” part, I thoroughly enjoyed it and would not hesitate to volunteer to do it again!